Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content

Discussions List : Prevent Child Abuse Georgia Newsletter November 2018
Use the Discussion list to hold forum-style conversations, including question and answer, on topics relevant to your team, project, or community.

Started: 11/8/2018 10:58 AM
Picture Placeholder: Dawna Hatcher
Dawna Hatcher
Prevent Child Abuse Georgia Newsletter November 2018

Thank you for subscribing to PCA Georgia's monthly newsletter. November 2018 Edition. Is this email not displaying correctly?
View it in your browser.


Prevent Child Abuse Georgia:Connecting Caregivers to Support 

1-800-CHILDREN
1-800-244-5373

Learn More 
View Resource Map
Help Promote 1-800-CHILDREN
 

SafeCare Founder & Former PCA Georgia Board Chair Retires

Dr. John R. Lutzker officially retired from Georgia State University at the end of October. As Director and founder of the Mark Chaffin Center for Healthy Development, he was responsible for bringing Prevent Child Abuse (PCA) Georgia to the university center in 2011. Many of you may also be familiar with the evidence-based home visiting program he created, SafeCare. His large body of work, primarily focused on the prevention of child maltreatment, has impacted the lives of countless families during his tenure. In 2017 alone, SafeCare served over 6,000 families in the U.S. and internationally. 

Upon retirement, GSU's President appointed him the honor of Professor Emeritus, in recognition of his significant contributions to the university and vulnerable populations everywhere. While he is known widely for his expertise on parenting, he is known best within our office for his mentorship, comradery, and passion. 

 


Parents Want to Know

Parents with more knowledge about parenting and child development are more likely to engage in positive parenting practices, but how do parents get this information? 
Parents are not always included in the planning of programs designed for them. Child Trends recently conducted a parent focus group with racially, ethnically, and economically diverse groups of first-time parents of infants and toddlers.  Parents raised the following five key points: 

  • They are eager for information on child development, but don't know how to obtain it.
  • They most commonly seek information during developmental transitions.
  • Parents of different backgrounds and identities had more commonalities than differences when it came to their parenting knowledge and information-seeking preferences and behavior.
  • The internet was a primary source of information.
  • Parents wanted clear, concise recommendations for parenting practices with examples of how to use them.

Programs should actively seek input from parents whenever possible to inform their practices and services deliveries. 
Read the full article with further explanation and suggestions.

 


Supporting Brain Development and Preventing Trauma: Two New Free Trainings
 

Build My Brain is a cross-disciplinary online course focused on the science and importance of early childhood development. The  course was inspired by a collaboration between GEEARS,  child-serving agencies, and Harvard University's Center on the Developing Child. Identifying how the science of early childhood development can be applied to policies and services for children birth to five can advance the Governor's goal of having every Georgia child reading on grade level by the end of third grade.

Find out how a child's brain architecture is constructed and how families, caregivers, and all adults can be great brain builders through the responsive interactions and nurturing relationships they have with children.

Access the training here: Georgia Build My Brain .


Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), such as child maltreatment, parental substance abuse, mental illness, and socioeconomic hardship, affect children and families across all communities. ACEs can affect a child's health and well-being, resulting in a lifetime of poorer health outcomes. Since ACEs impact so many across the nation, society as a whole must understand how we can all help prevent ACEs. 

A recently released CDC training helps us recognize, understand, and prevent ACEs.  Learn about risks and protective factors, outcomes associated with ACEs, and strategies you can use to reduce or eliminate the impact of ACEs. 

This trainings is free and recommended for any audience. 
Start Training Now 
Approved for 1.5 hours of BFTS credit.

 Interested in ACEs? Sign-up for the Georgia ACEs Connection, a publicly open action-based online group for individuals, sectors, and communities that are utilizing the ACEs science to implement trauma-informed and resilience-building practices and policies.

 


GA Family Support Network 

Georgia has joined the National Family Support Network and has already begun training organizations in the national standards. The development of shared standards across the state is an important strategic step towards defining and promoting quality practices for families. What makes these Standards unique is that they are the first to integrate and operationalize both the principles of family support practice and the research-based evidence-informed Strengthening Families Protective Factors framework. 

PCA Georgia is excited to be a Standards Trainer and have family support centers represented as local councils. 

For more information about becoming part of the network contact Deborah Chosewood at deborah.chosewood@dhs.ga.gov


DFCS Director's Open Letter to the Child Welfare Community 

On October 16, Georgia DFCS issued an Open Letter to the Child Welfare Community to begin the process of open communication and engagement with the entire child welfare system around the Family First Prevention Services Act. Partners in the advocacy, provider, and legal and judicial communities are invited to share this letter broadly within professional and community networks.

 

 


Youth Thrive™ Survey Launch

All youth and young adults deserve to be supported in ways that support their healthy development. One of the best ways to support them is to ask them directly how they are doing. The Youth Thrive Survey  is the first instrument that is based on positive constructs.  This web-based survey measures the presence, strength, and growth of Youth Thrive Protective and Promotive Factors as proxy indicators of well-being.  Information collected is intended to help organizations reach youth in new and meaningful ways through real-time data directly from the youth that organizations are serving. 

For more insight on how this survey can benefit your organization, please register for the informational webinar that will be held November 14, 2018


Register Now


CONNECT WITH US


Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Visit our Website
Forward this to a Friend

ABOUT US


 

Prevent Child Abuse Georgia is a state chapter of Prevent Child Abuse America. We provide statewide direction to prevent child abuse and neglect, promote healthy children, and develop strong families through our prevention network, public awareness, prevention programs, and advocacy. 
Learn more about us here!

 

 

CONTACT US


 

Julia Neighbors
Director
Jneighbors@gsu.edu

Naeshia McDowell
Helpline & Training Coordinator
nmcdowell2@gsu.edu
 
Jyll Walsh
Communication & Outreach Coordinator
Jwalsh10@gsu.edu

 



GIVING


 

Support PCA Georgia by giving today.

 




Upcoming Events



The Summit: Georgia's Child Welfare Conference
Hosted by the Office of the Child Advocate
Omni Atlanta Hotel at CNN Center
December 3-5, 2018 
Registration Opening Soon

11th Annual GA Association for Positive Behavior (GAPBS) Support Conference
Hosted by the Center for Leadership in Disability
GA World Congress Center
December 5-6, 2018 
Register Now


This project was supported in part by the Georgia Department of Human Services, Division of Family and Children Services and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Community Based Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CFDA 93.590). Points of view or opinions stated in this document are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the Georgia Department of Human Services, Division of Family and Children Services or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Community Based Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CFDA 93.590). 
 


 

 follow on Twitter | like on Facebook | forward to a friend 


 


 unsubscribe from this list | update subscription preferences | view email in browser  



Picture Placeholder: Dawna Hatcher
  • Dawna Hatcher
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Dawna Hatcher" />
Dawna Hatcher

Thank you for subscribing to PCA Georgia's monthly newsletter. November 2018 Edition. Is this email not displaying correctly?
View it in your browser.


Prevent Child Abuse Georgia:Connecting Caregivers to Support 

1-800-CHILDREN
1-800-244-5373

Learn More 
View Resource Map
Help Promote 1-800-CHILDREN
 

SafeCare Founder & Former PCA Georgia Board Chair Retires

Dr. John R. Lutzker officially retired from Georgia State University at the end of October. As Director and founder of the Mark Chaffin Center for Healthy Development, he was responsible for bringing Prevent Child Abuse (PCA) Georgia to the university center in 2011. Many of you may also be familiar with the evidence-based home visiting program he created, SafeCare. His large body of work, primarily focused on the prevention of child maltreatment, has impacted the lives of countless families during his tenure. In 2017 alone, SafeCare served over 6,000 families in the U.S. and internationally. 

Upon retirement, GSU's President appointed him the honor of Professor Emeritus, in recognition of his significant contributions to the university and vulnerable populations everywhere. While he is known widely for his expertise on parenting, he is known best within our office for his mentorship, comradery, and passion. 

 


Parents Want to Know

Parents with more knowledge about parenting and child development are more likely to engage in positive parenting practices, but how do parents get this information? 
Parents are not always included in the planning of programs designed for them. Child Trends recently conducted a parent focus group with racially, ethnically, and economically diverse groups of first-time parents of infants and toddlers.  Parents raised the following five key points: 

  • They are eager for information on child development, but don't know how to obtain it.
  • They most commonly seek information during developmental transitions.
  • Parents of different backgrounds and identities had more commonalities than differences when it came to their parenting knowledge and information-seeking preferences and behavior.
  • The internet was a primary source of information.
  • Parents wanted clear, concise recommendations for parenting practices with examples of how to use them.

Programs should actively seek input from parents whenever possible to inform their practices and services deliveries. 
Read the full article with further explanation and suggestions.

 


Supporting Brain Development and Preventing Trauma: Two New Free Trainings
 

Build My Brain is a cross-disciplinary online course focused on the science and importance of early childhood development. The  course was inspired by a collaboration between GEEARS,  child-serving agencies, and Harvard University's Center on the Developing Child. Identifying how the science of early childhood development can be applied to policies and services for children birth to five can advance the Governor's goal of having every Georgia child reading on grade level by the end of third grade.

Find out how a child's brain architecture is constructed and how families, caregivers, and all adults can be great brain builders through the responsive interactions and nurturing relationships they have with children.

Access the training here: Georgia Build My Brain .


Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), such as child maltreatment, parental substance abuse, mental illness, and socioeconomic hardship, affect children and families across all communities. ACEs can affect a child's health and well-being, resulting in a lifetime of poorer health outcomes. Since ACEs impact so many across the nation, society as a whole must understand how we can all help prevent ACEs. 

A recently released CDC training helps us recognize, understand, and prevent ACEs.  Learn about risks and protective factors, outcomes associated with ACEs, and strategies you can use to reduce or eliminate the impact of ACEs. 

This trainings is free and recommended for any audience. 
Start Training Now 
Approved for 1.5 hours of BFTS credit.

 Interested in ACEs? Sign-up for the Georgia ACEs Connection, a publicly open action-based online group for individuals, sectors, and communities that are utilizing the ACEs science to implement trauma-informed and resilience-building practices and policies.

 


GA Family Support Network 

Georgia has joined the National Family Support Network and has already begun training organizations in the national standards. The development of shared standards across the state is an important strategic step towards defining and promoting quality practices for families. What makes these Standards unique is that they are the first to integrate and operationalize both the principles of family support practice and the research-based evidence-informed Strengthening Families Protective Factors framework. 

PCA Georgia is excited to be a Standards Trainer and have family support centers represented as local councils. 

For more information about becoming part of the network contact Deborah Chosewood at deborah.chosewood@dhs.ga.gov


DFCS Director's Open Letter to the Child Welfare Community 

On October 16, Georgia DFCS issued an Open Letter to the Child Welfare Community to begin the process of open communication and engagement with the entire child welfare system around the Family First Prevention Services Act. Partners in the advocacy, provider, and legal and judicial communities are invited to share this letter broadly within professional and community networks.

 

 


Youth Thrive™ Survey Launch

All youth and young adults deserve to be supported in ways that support their healthy development. One of the best ways to support them is to ask them directly how they are doing. The Youth Thrive Survey  is the first instrument that is based on positive constructs.  This web-based survey measures the presence, strength, and growth of Youth Thrive Protective and Promotive Factors as proxy indicators of well-being.  Information collected is intended to help organizations reach youth in new and meaningful ways through real-time data directly from the youth that organizations are serving. 

For more insight on how this survey can benefit your organization, please register for the informational webinar that will be held November 14, 2018


Register Now


CONNECT WITH US


Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Visit our Website
Forward this to a Friend

ABOUT US


 

Prevent Child Abuse Georgia is a state chapter of Prevent Child Abuse America. We provide statewide direction to prevent child abuse and neglect, promote healthy children, and develop strong families through our prevention network, public awareness, prevention programs, and advocacy. 
Learn more about us here!

 

 

CONTACT US


 

Julia Neighbors
Director
Jneighbors@gsu.edu

Naeshia McDowell
Helpline & Training Coordinator
nmcdowell2@gsu.edu
 
Jyll Walsh
Communication & Outreach Coordinator
Jwalsh10@gsu.edu

 



GIVING


 

Support PCA Georgia by giving today.

 




Upcoming Events



The Summit: Georgia's Child Welfare Conference
Hosted by the Office of the Child Advocate
Omni Atlanta Hotel at CNN Center
December 3-5, 2018 
Registration Opening Soon

11th Annual GA Association for Positive Behavior (GAPBS) Support Conference
Hosted by the Center for Leadership in Disability
GA World Congress Center
December 5-6, 2018 
Register Now


This project was supported in part by the Georgia Department of Human Services, Division of Family and Children Services and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Community Based Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CFDA 93.590). Points of view or opinions stated in this document are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the Georgia Department of Human Services, Division of Family and Children Services or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Community Based Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CFDA 93.590). 
 


 

 follow on Twitter | like on Facebook | forward to a friend 


 


 unsubscribe from this list | update subscription preferences | view email in browser  



011/8/2018 10:58 AM11/8/2018 10:58 AMNoStudent Physical and Mental Health
0
9/24/2018 8:19 AM
There are no items to show in this view of the "Discussions List" discussion board.